All posts by patricia ortiz

CHS newest teacher is here.

Thelma Phillilps

Chaparral High School’s (CHS) newest Language Arts teacher, here since August 22, is Thelma Phillips.

Phillips teaches English Language Arts for sophomores and juniors.She has taught English Language Arts for 27 years.

“I like teaching at CHS very much, everyone is friendly. When Mrs. Lopez and Mr. Mata interviewed they were very nice to me,” said Phillips. Before teaching at CHS she taught at Andress High School, in the El Paso Independent District of Texas for 27 years.

Phillips can make students future a success by talking about getting a career or going to college confidently.

Phillips considers herself an open-minded and smart person. “I can make their future a success by having them doing my work in class.”

“I will be at CHS as long as they let me,” said Phillips.

Say goodbye to puddles, and hello to the new drains

Say goodbye to puddles, and hello to the new drains.

Chaparral High School (CHS) principal, Victoria Lopez talked about the drains at CHS, “The drains are for the water to dig in. When it rained we would have big puddles and people couldn’t even pass through there, so drains are to get rid of the puddles.” The workers stared digging in mid-July.

The drains help the campus by draining standing water and preventing puddles so mosquitoes and trash won’t gather.

If the drains are blocked, the water won’t be draining. Lopez said, “The drains are hard to get blocked because they’re 22 foot long pipes going down.”

“The drain that is in front of the school was completed by August 24, 2018,” said Lopez.

“The cost is around $20,00. the school can afford the drains ,” said Lopez.

located in front of the nurse
located behind the main gym

 

Cubs respond to retirement of pack leader

The only principal most of us have ever known is retiring.

“It’s crazy because he is retiring at the same time I’m graduating and he has been the principal since my freshman year, I feel surprised,” said Chaparral High School senior Anthony Soriano.

Soriano is going to miss the way he worked with students. Soriano would like the next principal to be like Mr. Rupcich.

“Mr. Rupcich was a good principal and he has improved the school,” said Soriano.

Meghan Garcia, senior at Chaparral High School thinks it’s a good thing that Mr. Rupcich is retiring.

“Sad, because he has been my principal for four years. After the contest he would talk to the band,” Garcia said. Garcia is going to miss his inspiration. Garcia liked how Mr. Rupcich encouraged students.

“When I first saw him I was kind of scared,” said Garcia, “Thank you Mr. Rupcich for being with me for four years”

Chaparral High School senior Daisy Molina, thinks that it’s good that Mr. Rupcich is retiring because he is going to get a break.

“What I liked about him is that he was always involved in activities,” said Molina. Molina thought that he was mean when she first saw him.

“I don’t want the next principal to be like Mr. Rupcich because he wasn’t strict and we need someone strict and get students on track,” said Molina, “I hope he has a wonderful life and take care.”

“I think is sad because nobody will have to experience him, I feel sad,” said Chaparral High School senior Jose Insurriaga.

Insurriaga is going to miss everything of Mr. Rupcich. Insurriaga liked that Mr. Rupcich was chill.

“I love you Mr. Rupcich,” said Insurriaga.

 

“It’s good for him he needs a break,” said Chaparral High School senior Jorge Hernandez.

Hernandez said, “He is a very good principal.” What Hernandez liked about Mr. Rupcich is that he actually did a lot of stuff with students.

The first impression Hernandez had with Mr. Rupcich was that he was going to be a good principal.

“Thank you for being a good principal,” said Hernandez.

“I think is great and look good for his age. It’s great. Everyone has to retire,” said Chaparral High School senior Ramon Espinoza.

Espinoza has had multiple with interactions with Mr. Rupcich because he coached his father for sports. Espinoza is going to miss Mr. Rupcich’s voice and that he captures authority.

“The first time I saw him I thought he was mean,” said Espinoza, “Thanks for supporting our school and football games.”

CHS senior Katelyn Gonzalez thinks and feels sad that Mr. Rupcich is retiring.

“I’m going to miss his mustache and his hair,” said Gonzalez.

Gonzalez said, “He was chill but took stuff serious. My first impression was that he took stuff serious.”

“Thank you for supporting our school.”

“I’m going to miss his mustache. What I liked was that he was pretty chill and good person to talk to,” said CHS senior Osvaldo Contreras.

The first impression Contreras had with Mr. Rupcich was strict.

“Good luck in life” said Contreras.

Mr. Rupcich will be missed by many of our seniors.

 

 

 

 

Expectations vs. Reality

Before I came to Chaparral High School for my freshman year, I was very nervous, scared and excited. I thought teachers were going to be mean, aggressive and strict. I also thought that there was going to be a lot of bullying.

My first day of school was kind of weird because a lot of people would stare at you like if they never saw a freshmen before. My friends and I would always be walking in lunch but other students would call us “freshmen.” But it was weird because most of the sophomores would call us freshmen and they were barely freshmen last year.

Every day I would come to school and ask myself if people were going to call us “freshmen” the whole year. Thank god they stopped calling us names. So my freshmen year has been okay except for the first week of school year. I felt kind of uncomfortable because I felt like if no one liked us.

I also thought there were going to be lockers so students can store their stuff in there. I thought high school was going to be hard but no it’s not that hard. It’s only hard if you don’t pay attention or you don’t make any effort. I thought I was going to get a lot of homework but most of my teachers don’t give me homework.

High school is different than middle school or elementary because in high school they provide birth control and condoms in the health office and in elementary or middle school they don’t. I knew that the health office provided birth control and condoms because during the first semester I had health class and the teacher told us that in the health class they would provide it.

What’s also different are the lunch lines. In elementary and middle school there was only two lines, and in high school we have five lines. The five lines have different types of food.

In high school the dress code is way different than middle school. In middle school we wore uniforms and in high school we can wear whatever we want. When I was in middle school I was excited to come to high school because I no longer have to wear a uniform. Some girls on Fridays dress up nice and in middle school we had to pay $1 for casual dress. We couldn’t wear ripped jeans, white jeans, tank tops, sandals, flip flops (basically open toe shoes) or inappropriate worded t-shirts.

I was also excited because I was going to meet more people. When I was in middle school I never saw students with piercings or tattoos but high school has a lot of students with piercings and tattoos, and teachers or principals don’t tell them anything.

My expectations for high school guys, was that guys were going to be taller than me but there are guys shorter and some are taller than me.

I also thought I was going to get lost. The schedules from middle school are different than high school. The classes from middle school were longer than high school classes. In high school we have different schedules: standard schedule, rally schedule, I-CAT schedule and EOC schedule. We only have these kinds of schedules when there’s testing, dances, pep-rallys, or I-CAT.

What I like about Chaparral High School is that teachers try to prepare students for college or university. We have classes called pathways that can help you for a career you like. Child development is a pathway that helps you become a teacher or you can work with children.

I thought dances were going to be cooler but they are not. Most of the students in the dances don’t dance. They stay with their friends.

I thought P.E class was going to be hard, I thought we were going to run every day or do exercise every day but no some days we go to the weight room or we just stay in the gym playing.

What I’ve seen more in high school than in middle school are the fights. This year I’ve watched 10 or more fights. When I was in middle school there were fights but not a lot and not that often like here in high school.

When I was in middle school there were times that I wanted to come to high school, but now that I’m in high school I miss middle school. I miss middle school because of some of the teachers I had. Some were cool and fun, and the others were easy. They would give me easy work or they would give second chances. Here, in high school they’re a little hard. Now that I’m in high school I like it and I got used to it.

There is more activities in high school than in middle school. In high school we have automotive, video production, yearbook, newspaper, nutrition, child and human development, health, weight training, culinary arts and life skills.

There’s more sports available in high school than in middle school. In high school we have golf, wrestling and tennis. And in middle school we didn’t had those two sports. Coaches are harder in high school. They get all the players to run and players also get to condition a lot.

 

SBA makes a science out of graduation.

 

CHS junior Nubia Soto

Chaparral High School junior Nubia Soto is one out of 210 juniors that took the Science SBA test in order to graduate.

This was Soto’s first timetaking the Science SBA test. Soto felt very overwhelmed and stressed, before taking the SBA. “When I was taking the test felt very cold and nervous,” said Soto. “My experience was very stressful and I think I should have studied more,” said Soto.

“I believe I won’t do that bad on the test,” said Soto. If you don’t pass or take the Science SBA you don’t graduate.

“You only have two chances to take the SBA. You take it in your junior year and if you don’t pass it or you don’t take it you have another chance I your senior year,” said Soto

“I prefer to take the SBA on a booklet than a computer,” said Soto.

Soto’s advice for all juniors is to study and get ready for any test.

Don’t stress, do your best.

The Science Standard base assessment (SBA) testing is coming!!!

Sofia Payen

Sofia Payen, Chaparral High School’s (CHS) assistant principal, is in charge of the Science SBA testing. SBA testing starts on Wednesday, March 7, but testing windows will be opening Monday.

The SBA has three sessions and students will be testing for the whole day. Payane says, “Students will be on testing schedule.” The science SBA is only for juniors.

“All labs are going to be used for testing, plus three extra labs. There’s 11 labs in total,” said Payen.

“Students have to take the Science SBA test to know content science and so we can gather data to see in what we can help them,” said Payen. Students are going to be tested on physical science, biology and chemistry.

“Students need to take the SBA because it’s very important for graduation,” said Payen.

There’s no dance without an organizer

Roses are red, salsa is hot, chocolates have calories and dancing does not. Lobos will be having a red and hot valentine’s day dance.

Susan Sanchez, junior sponsor, is organizing the Valentine’s Day dance at CHS. The dance will be from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. in the cafeteria.

Sanchez has been planning the dance since Christmas break. The Valentine’s Day dance is on February 14th.

“Mr. Rupcich had the idea of having a Valentine’s Day dance because we need more money for prom since it’s going to be in a ballroom (Cascadas ballroom),” said Sanchez. The decorations that Sanchez is making are balloons, doylies, posters, cupids, hearts and garlands.

“The 2019 and 2021 class officers are going to be helping decorate and the 2020 class officers are going to work in the concession stand,” said Sanchez.

DJ Manuel Bonilla, who won the contest in the Homecoming dance, is going to be playing at the Valentine’s Day dance.

“We need many people in the dance, bracelets are going to cost two dollars,” said Sanchez. Sanchez is selling the bracelets in room A-104.

CHS finally has a new physical science teacher

Gary Frischman is Chaparral High School’s (CHS) new physical science teacher. CHS has been short on teachers since the beginning of the year.

Frischman has taught

Gary Frischman

physical science for 24 years. Frischman lives in El Paso TX, so that’s what interested Frischman about CHS that is closer to El Paso than Las Cruses.

“The high school I attended was Mt. Rainier high school and I graduated in 1981. It is located at Seattle, Washington,” said Frischman. The university Frischman attended was

John Brown University located in Arkansas and graduated with a Business Administration Economics degree in 1988 and with a Secondary Science Education degree in 1992.

He decided to go to college in Arkansas because he received a swimming scholarship. Frischman plans on teaching at CHS for five years. “I like working with students, young people and people who are generally happy, content, and not perfect,” said Frischman.

“I’ve also taught economics, government, U.S history, English one, English two, Algebra one and biology,” said Frischman.

Frischman was married to a Salvadorena, so he worked for Escuela Americana in El Salvador for one year and he taught only English. Frischman also taught in El Paso’s Socorro district for 22 years.

New physical science teacher at CHS!!

Gary Frischmann is Chaparral High School’s (CHS) new science teacher. CHS has been short on science teachers since the beginning of the school year and now spots are being filled. Frischmann is a physical science teacher and he will be in room G-6.

Frischmann is going to start teaching when students return from winter break January 10, 2018. While Frischmann is out, students are taking on line classes via E2020.

Christmas is not celebrated everywhere or by everybody.

Here is how many Christians and non-Christians celebrate Christmas in the world.

According to the www.twowaybreakingnews.com there are about 2.2 billion Christians in the world, which makes up about 30 percent of the 7.6 billion people in total. In the United States, there are about 280 million Christians out of 323 million (2010 Census).

Washington Times says that 96 percent of Christians celebrate Christmas in the U.S.A. Christians believe that Jesus is the light of the world.

Eighty one percent of Americans celebrate Christmas December 25, commemorating the birth of Jesus.

Christians and non-Christians alike celebrate Christmas. Two-thirds (65 percent) of Christians say Christmas is mostly a religious holiday, while most non-Christians see the holiday as more of a cultural event, ( Washington Times).

People around the world have been observing it with traditions and practices that are of both religious and secular nature. According to the History.com Christmas evolved over two millennia into a worldwide religious holiday.

Today, Christmas is a time for family and friends to get together and exchange gifts. The name Christmas comes from the Mass of Christ or Jesus.

Livescience.com says,” Pagan, or non-Christian, traditions show up in this beloved winter holiday, a consequence of early church leaders melding Jesus’ nativity celebration with pre-existing midwinter festivals.”

People from different countries don’t celebrate Christmas because it is not as common as it is in the United States.